AT&T AVPN Configuration

This guide is for network engineers and architects using their 128T Session Smart router to connect to AT&T’s MPLS VPN (AVPN) service. It will cover:

  • Service class definitions for the various COS queues on the AT&T MPLS network
  • Strategies for mapping service configuration to the COS queues using service-policy elements
  • Guidelines for setting your traffic-engineering properties, to match the circuit profile of your AT&T MPLS link
note

While the techniques described here apply to any MPLS connection, they will be most valuable when engineering branch office (i.e., smaller) MPLS links, due to the higher likelihood of congestion.

This document is intended to be a companion guide to the AT&T Network-Based Class of Service Customer Router Configuration Guide. At the time of this writing, the latest version is Release 4.0, December 2016.

AT&T Service Classes

The AT&T AVPN MPLS network uses six distinct classes of service for carrying customer traffic, as well as a seventh “control” queue for communication between the CE and PE router. This section describes each of the classes of service and provides 128T configuration fragments to illustrate how to configure your 128T Session Smart router to interact with the AVPN network.

note

This document assumes the use of a 6COS circuit profile. The 4COS circuit does not use the COS2V nor COS5 classes of service. Otherwise, the recommendations made in this document apply.

caution

In each of the service-class configuration excerpts below, you will see it has been assigned a traffic-class. The 128T Session Smart router has four traffic classes, in order of priority: high, medium, low, best-effort. This is different from other network equipment, which may order the priorities as high, medium, best-effort, low.

All of the service-class elements in this section are provided as an appendix to this document, to facilitate their import (or copy/paste) into your existing 128T configuration.

COS1: Real-time

The COS1 class is treated differently than the other classes on AVPN; any packets received that are marked as COS1 exceed the configured bandwidth, they are explicitly dropped ("hard policed"). Packets are identified as COS1 through the use of the "EF" DSCP marking (decimal 46).

COS1 is typically reserved for Voice over IP (VoIP) traffic.

Configuration:

admin@AAPCDCVACON0A.AAPCONPOD0# show config run auth service-class ATT-COS1
config
authority
service-class ATT-COS1
name ATT-COS1
description "Real-time applications (EF)"
dscp 46
traffic-class high
exit
exit
exit

COS2V: Delay-sensitive applications

The COS2V queue, identified through the use of the DSCP value AF41 (decimal 34), is typically reserved for video conferencing traffic.

Configuration

admin@AAPCDCVACON0A.AAPCONPOD0# show config run auth service-class ATT-COS2V
config
authority
service-class ATT-COS2V
name ATT-COS2V
description "Delay-sensitive applications (AF41)"
dscp 34
traffic-class medium
exit
exit
exit

COS2: Time-critical applications

The COS2 queue, identified through the use of DSCP AF31 (decimal 26), is to be used for time-sensitive, mission-critical, low bandwidth applications. This is the recommended class VoIP signaling (e.g., SIP, H.323, SCCP), as it is low-bandwidth (typically a small number of kilobits per second) but extremely time-sensitive.

Configuration

admin@AAPCDCVACON0A.AAPCONPOD0# show config run auth service-class ATT-COS2
config
authority
service-class ATT-COS2
name ATT-COS2
description "Time-sensitive mission-critical low-bandwidth applications (AF31)"
dscp 26
traffic-class medium
exit
exit
exit

COS3: Time-sensitive applications

This class of service should include all mission-critical applications that are interactive in nature; that is, they correspond to applications that are transactional in nature. In enterprises this may be a CRM system, an ERP system, or other important client/server applications.

COS3 is distinguishable by its DSCP value of AF21 (decimal 18).

Configuration

admin@AAPCDCVACON0A.AAPCONPOD0# show config run auth service-class ATT-COS3
config
authority
service-class ATT-COS3
name ATT-COS3
description "Time-sensitive mission-critical applications (AF21)"
dscp 18
traffic-class medium
exit
exit
exit

COS4: Best Effort

The "best effort" class is the one that should be used by the majority of network traffic.

There is no DSCP value associated with best effort traffic (decimal 0).

Configuration

admin@AAPCDCVACON0A.AAPCONPOD0# show config run auth service-class ATT-COS4
config
authority
service-class ATT-COS4
name ATT-COS4
description "Best effort (default)"
dscp 0
traffic-class best-effort
exit
exit
exit

COS5: Scavenger

The last class of service for customer traffic is COS5, or scavenger. This is for all non business-oriented traffic. This typically gets the lowest allocation when assigning traffic engineering percentages, and thus will experience congestion first.

Scavenger traffic is identified as COS5 through the use of the AF11 DSCP value (decimal 10).

Configuration

admin@AAPCDCVACON0A.AAPCONPOD0# show config run auth service-class ATT-COS5
config
authority
service-class ATT-COS5
name ATT-COS5
description "Scavenger (AF11)"
dscp 10
traffic-class best-effort
exit
exit
exit

Control Queue

The control queue is used for communicating between the CE and PE router, and should typically be limited to BGP and BFD only. This is an extremely low bandwidth queue.

warning

In many deployments the 128T does not BGP peer with the PE router, and in no deployments will the 128T send BFD to the PE router. Do not mark BFD or BGP with DSCP CS6/decimal 48. This is only presented for completeness, or when BGP peering with the PE router.

Configuration

admin@AAPCDCVACON0A.AAPCONPOD0# show config run auth service-class ATT-control
config
authority
service-class ATT-control
name ATT-control
description "Control traffic only (CS6)"
dscp 48
traffic-class high
exit
exit
exit

Service Policies

The 128T will use service-policy to indicate which sessions need to get marked and treated with the session-type configurations. Each service should have a corresponding service-policy, to ensure that the markings are applied and the correct traffic-class is used for traffic engineering.

The base class service-policy configurations presented here are derived from the BCP on Service Policy.

Base service-policyAVPN service-class
voip-audioATT-COS1
voip-videoATT-COS2V
video-streamingATT-COS2V
voip-signalingATT-COS2
data-mission-criticalATT-COS2
remote-desktopATT-COS2
management-interactiveATT-COS3
management-m2mATT-COS3
data-interactiveATT-COS3
data-best-effortATT-COS4
data-scavengerATT-COS5
video-streaming-scavengerATT-COS5

Traffic Engineering Strategies

The 128T router uses four traffic engineering queues for prioritizing egress traffic during times of congestion or link contention. The general practice of mapping the traffic-class assignments (high, medium, low, best-effort) into the various 6COS queues is shown below.

graph LR voip-audio --> ATT-COS1 id1(BFD, BGP) -.-> ATT-control voip-video --> ATT-COS2V video-streaming --> ATT-COS2V voip-signaling --> ATT-COS2 data-mission-critical --> ATT-COS2 remote-desktop --> ATT-COS2 management-interactive --> ATT-COS3 management-m2m --> ATT-COS3 data-interactive --> ATT-COS3 data-best-effort --> ATT-COS4 data-scavenger --> ATT-COS5 video-streaming-scavenger --> ATT-COS5 subgraph best-effort ATT-COS5 end subgraph low ATT-COS4 end subgraph medium ATT-COS2V ATT-COS2 ATT-COS3 end subgraph high ATT-COS1 ATT-control end

Each AT&T AVPN circuit has a profile associated with it (referred to as a "COS Package"), that maps to bandwidth allocations for the various COS queues. These in turn need to be mapped to the four egress traffic engineering queues on the 128T. The COS Package from AT&T is expressed as a set of six numbers (corresponding to the queues), where the first number is the percentage of the circuit bandwidth allocated for COS1, and the remaining five numbers (which sum to 100%) represent the amount of bandwidth remaining from the bandwidth not used by COS1.

warning

Math involved.

Sizing the Traffic Engineering Policy

Traffic ClassValue
highCOS1 percentage from COS Profile
medium(sum of COS2V + COS2 + COS3) * (100% - COS1 bandwidth)
lowCOS4 * (100% - COS1 bandwidth)
best-effortCOS5 * (100% - COS1 bandwidth)

Example (simple COS profile for a 6COS model):

COS1COS2VCOS2COS3COS4COS5
5%20%20%20%20%20%

In this case, the high percentage is 5. The medium class gets 60% (20% + 20% + 20%) of the remaining 95%, which is 57. The low class gets 20% of the remaining 95%, which is 19. And best-effort also gets 20%, which is 19.

note

These values are merely starting points that should line up to the COS Profile of the AT&T AVPN circuit. Further tuning is left to the discretion of the network engineer.

The traffic-profile would therefore look like this:

*admin@labsystem1.fiedler# show config candidate authority traffic-profile 6COS-simple
config
authority
traffic-profile 6COS-simple
name 6COS-simple
high
distribution 5
exit
medium
distribution 57
exit
low
distribution 19
exit
best-effort
distribution 19
exit
exit
exit
exit

This traffic-profile is applied to a device-interface:

*admin@labsystem1.fiedler# show config candidate authority router newton node labsystem2 device eno4 traffic-engineering
config
authority
router newton
name newton
node labsystem2
name labsystem2
device-interface eno4
name eno4
traffic-engineering
transmit-cap 100000000
traffic-profile 6COS-simple
exit
exit
exit
exit
exit
exit

Appendix: Service Class Configuration

The following configuration output is presented here to facilitate copy/paste into your 128T conductor.

note

Because the dscp value is a key field for the service-class object, no two service-class configurations can share the same value. This will likely require you to delete existing service-class configuration, as the 128T ships with factory default service-class elements that will conflict with the ones presented below.

config authority service-class ATT-COS1 name ATT-COS1
config authority service-class ATT-COS1 description "Real-time applications (EF)"
config authority service-class ATT-COS1 dscp 46
config authority service-class ATT-COS1 traffic-class high
config authority service-class ATT-COS2V name ATT-COS2V
config authority service-class ATT-COS2V description "Delay-sensitive applications (AF41)"
config authority service-class ATT-COS2V dscp 34
config authority service-class ATT-COS2V traffic-class medium
config authority service-class ATT-COS2 name ATT-COS2
config authority service-class ATT-COS2 description "Time-sensitive mission-critical low-bandwidth applications (AF31)"
config authority service-class ATT-COS2 dscp 26
config authority service-class ATT-COS2 traffic-class medium
config authority service-class ATT-COS3 name ATT-COS3
config authority service-class ATT-COS3 description "Time-sensitive mission-critical applications (AF21)"
config authority service-class ATT-COS3 dscp 18
config authority service-class ATT-COS3 traffic-class medium
config authority service-class ATT-COS4 name ATT-COS4
config authority service-class ATT-COS4 description "Best effort (default)"
config authority service-class ATT-COS4 dscp 0
config authority service-class ATT-COS4 traffic-class best-effort
config authority service-class ATT-COS5 name ATT-COS5
config authority service-class ATT-COS5 description "Scavenger (AF11)"
config authority service-class ATT-COS5 dscp 10
config authority service-class ATT-COS5 traffic-class best-effort
config authority service-class ATT-control name ATT-control
config authority service-class ATT-control description "Control traffic only (CS6)"
config authority service-class ATT-control dscp 48
config authority service-class ATT-control traffic-class high
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